“Beyond Levels” : tackling the issue of mixed levels in workshops and the self-assessment subjectivity problem

In order to tackle the issue of mixed levels in workshops we decided soon after opening Anatomie Studio to work with pre-requisites rather than levels (i.e. intermediate, advanced, etc) for workshops happening in the space.

So far we are extremely pleased with this method and have experienced more homogeneous cohorts in our workshops.

We’ve been asked by several people to publish examples of the pre-requisites we use and how we phrase them, so that’s what this writing is.

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What does this mean?

This means that belong ‘beginners’ we don’t use terms like ‘intermediate’ or ‘advanced’ as there is a large degree if subjectivity in how people self-asses their rope skills (whether rigging or bottoming).

Instead we list the knowledge (theoretical or practical) that attendees should gave before attending the workshop, much like we list the items (ropes, gear, clothing) that attendees should bring to the workshop.

Pre-requisites are listed for rope bottoms and riggers.

I should mention that the pre-requisites are not enforced – meaning that we don’t actually go around checking if people are being honest about meeting the pre-requisites – we assume people are informed adults that will take on the responsibility of meeting them before the class.

We use the Takate Kote (here on after referred to as ‘TK’) as a standard measure of skill for both rope bottoms and rigger regardless of whether workshops are Takate Kote based.

Are there disadvantages?

Because pre-requisites are not enforced there is always a risk that some people will not have met the pre-requisites for the workshop.

Anatomie Studio Pre-requisites for Workshops and Classes

These are the pre-requisite combinations that we currently use in the studio.

1 – No pre-requisites for riggers or models
 [for example: for our Discover Shibari classes]

2 – Riggers: must know a non-collapsible single column tie / Bottoms: must know the difference between nerve and circulation impingement, and must be able to give appropriate feedback [for example: for our Takate Kote class]

3 – Riggers: must know to tie a structural TK2 taught in a class, workshop or private tuition 
/ Bottoms: same as above plus should be comfortable being tied in a TK [for example: for our Third Rope class]

4 – Riggers: must know a structured TK3 and how to attach mainlines taught in a class, workshop or private tuition 
/ Bottoms: same as above plus should be comfortable being suspended from a TK [for example: for our Fly! Intro to Suspension class]

5 – Riggers: must be comfortable suspending from a structured TK2 or TK3 and comfortable with suspension line management taught in a class, workshop or private tuition 
/ Bottoms: same as above [for example: for our Fly More! Intro to Transitions class]

6 – Riggers: must be comfortable/proficient with suspension transitions from a TK2 or TK3 taught in a class, workshop or private tuition 
/ Bottoms: must be experienced with suspension transitions (including being self-aware and have good body management skills), must also be able to give appropriate feedback [for example: for Pedro’s ‘Bamboo and Shibari’ workshop]

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